Meltwater

Any other INTJs here?

42 posts in this topic

Hello community,

I really love Teal's work and message and am delighted to be here and to make new friends. I'm an INTJ (myers-briggs personality type) and curious to know if there are any other INTJs here. Perhaps most people here are feeling types? I think Teal has quite a well developed T aspect despite being INFJ by her own admission. Conversely I try to develop my F side. Key I think is not to be so T (logical and fact-believing) to compromise discourse and getting to know one another and not be so F (socially focused and emotion based) to compromise your internal convictions. Thoughts?

Maybe I should post in some of the other forums here because I'm not sure the introductions section is that frequently read?

 

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Hi @Ollie  INTJ here.  

I agree that Teal has very well developed 'Thinking'. More than Thinking or Feeling, I think nearly everyone here are Intuitives (N) over Sensors (S). Though there's probably a majority of Feelers- especially since the core of Teal's teachings is that Emotions and Feelings are the Inner Compass to knowing how to identify desires, make choices, and navigate Life.  I sometimes wonder if Teal's emotion-centric way of perceiving how to navigate Life is less a Universal piece of advice, more a Feeling- focused Perspective. If, for example, Teal had Thinking as her primary way of 'judging' the world, would she suggest more Mind and Thought centric ways of self-knowing and change. (Like CBT)?. 

12 hours ago, Ollie said:

T (logical and fact-believing)

Thinking, imo, is predominantly judging based criteria of logic. Extroverted Thinking, specifically focuses on seeking out supportive facts in the external world. Sensation however sees 'facts' as absolute; i.e. they believe in facts. INTJs, having Extroverted Thinking as secondary to Introverted Intuition, can see facts as optional. As Intuition can prove no sensory proof- which often can be good enough- more tangible, even. 

12 hours ago, Ollie said:

Maybe I should post in some of the other forums here because I'm not sure the introductions section is that frequently read?

It might be best in a different part of the forum...but I can see why you put it in the introduction- asking someone what their M.B. type is, is a good way of introducing oneself, plus creating connection and mutual insight.

Edited by Andrea Barrett
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@Tammy OK so first of all thank you for getting me to look into this because this is kind of amazing.

What is so interesting is that I literally decided last week that I need to work on becoming more powerful and more in control of myself and people around me (see edit below) and now I do this enneagram test and I get this:

  • Type 1: Orderliness||||||||||||42%
  • Type 2: Helpfulness||||||||||||50%
  • Type 3: Image Focus||||||||||||||54%
  • Type 4: Individualism||||||||||||42%
  • Type 5: Intellectualism||||||||||||||58%
  • Type 6: Security Focus||||||30%
  • Type 7: Adventurousness||||||26%
  • Type 8: Aggressiveness||||||||||||||||70%
  • Type 9: Calmness||||||||||||46%

showing that type 8 for leader with the central belief: I must be strong and in control to survive. http://9types.com/epd/8.php

That's exactly me. Not saying I'm any good at it though. Actually think I'm useless but I know why that is and I'm working on it.What's your type Tammy? Ah OK just saw you posted it. Good to know. I'm not against calmness by any means but really I crave energy and intensity because I've been so low energy my whole life.

Edit: should point out that when I say controlling other people I mean co-ordinating actions and activity rather than controlling emotions. I'm not suggesting manipulating people only getting them to work in a way that effectively achieved and mutually agreed upon objective. Phew that was quite a lot of words!

Edited by Ollie
Adding mention of Tammy, still getting used to this forum

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Hi @Andrea Barrett great to see another INTJ here. What drew you to Teal?

Responding to your point about emotion-driven style being a reflection of Teal's personality: I agree but don't think that subtracts anything from the validity of what she says. I'm conscious that I'm probably going to use a more cerebral approach but I suppose to me that makes her advice more valuable because I appreciate a perspective that is less familiar to me. Also want to develop my own style at the same time though. Other thing is that I don't consider her especially emotion driven; she's very well reasoned IMO. Although I'm still going to try to pick holes in her advise because that's part of the learning process for me.

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8 minutes ago, Ollie said:

What drew you to Teal?

Ultimately it was that I intuitively agreed with the truth of much of her ideas. Many of her comments validated insights I'd had which were half-forgotten and which I had over time automatically rejected. One of the first things I thought about her was 'I want to be more like that, have the poise, the awareness about the world and knowledge to apply it to properly change my life'. In a way I was at a point where I wanted to delve into my emotions and develop my feeling side, and saw qualities in her I wanted to develop.  I guess another main reason is that I have had a lot of challenges and difficulties in my life- I wanted to change it and she was one of the first 'self help people where I felt her ideas actually addressed the root causes of issues.

 

16 minutes ago, Ollie said:

I'm still going to try to pick holes in her advise because that's part of the learning process for me.

I do that as well. It's a way of deciding what to take on board and what not to- so often its all or nothing with people. In a way, if her advice survives the 'picking holes in it stage' then I stick with the idea (until the next 'evaluation' based on other pieces of info). 

Often I've found when 'picking holes' in other people's ideas it easily offends- but in reality its a sign that I'm taking their ideas seriously- for if I hadn't then it would have been because it's obviously not worth considering or not interesting enough. 

   

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@Andrea Barrett Curious how you came to even be aware of Teal though? Why did you even care to watch a video / read a book by her in the first place? Some sort of interest in spirituality or the recommendation of a friend perhaps?

9 minutes ago, Andrea Barrett said:

she was one of the first 'self help people where I felt her ideas actually addressed the root causes of issues.

Totally. And I think that high level of fundamentality is critical. It is always what I have sought to achieve with my own judgements i.e. if something is true it should be true all the way down and all the way up and if it is no how can it be adjusted so that it is?

11 minutes ago, Andrea Barrett said:

I do that as well. It's a way of deciding what to take on board and what not to

I have the same process as you. I think it is good to remind people of this criticism indicates respect tendency and also state what you appreciate and possible limitations to the criticisms.

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40 minutes ago, Ollie said:

Why did you even care to watch a video / read a book by her in the first place? Some sort of interest in spirituality or the recommendation of a friend perhaps?

It started when I got into nutrition and changed my way of eating, and when I googled/youtubed to find recipes I found people mainly discussing the spiritual/ethical aspects. I've always been curious about spirituality. (When I was 13 I got into Christianity, to the horror of my atheist parents, and then at 15 Buddhism, but for the next 5 or 6 years I didn't follow any system but was into comparing religious and spiritual systems for universal truths. Psychology and Philosophy also greatly interest me).  Anyway,  I watched the videos on 'spiritual' food and lifestyles, and after Teal's videos kept getting recommended, I watched one. I think it was 'you don't fear the unknown' with her in black and a library background,  and at first thought she was interesting enough to bookmark/subscribe, then a few months later properly got into her ideas, (when stuck writing a university essay about the devil, demons etc., procrastinating, and  I noticed Teal had a video about demons and was curious about her Perspective). 

40 minutes ago, Ollie said:

criticism indicates respect tendency

What a succinct way of putting it- I think I'll be using that from now on... 

  That being said, I think Teal has a video on 'Constructive Criticism' which made me reconsider whether being critical all the time- or even any of the time- is that good. But then what we mean by 'criticism' encompasses more than just constructive criticism- it's more a questioning to understand, pattern and consistency-seeking lens.

Over time, and since seeing the aforementioned video, I have reduced this tendency though, when connecting to people. I save it for like minded people, and when doing intellectual work or for piecing together ideas and understanding about the world for myself. I see it more as a tool to use sometimes- not necessarily the only lens to apply to a situation. Inevitably though, it is the easiest to fall into, as a habit. If I'm not careful, its easy to create misunderstandings when the 'other' has different personality type/value system and uses a different inner lens, and interprets ways of interacting differently.

Edited by Andrea Barrett
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6 minutes ago, Andrea Barrett said:

It started when I got into nutrition and changed my way of eating

Uncanny. For me it was a very similar motivation, somewhat less specific: health.

8 minutes ago, Andrea Barrett said:

what a succinct way of putting it- I think I'll be using that from now on... 

I think you're more on it with your not criticizing thing. I don't think you can expect people to get it, not immediately anyway, depends how close you are. Criticism can be kind of a illness in some people because they feel threatened by things better than what they have been able to create. I catch myself doing that occasionally but I don't stand for it because I think it's a really horrible way to be.

16 minutes ago, Andrea Barrett said:

If I'm not careful, its easy to create misunderstandings when the 'other' has different personality type/value system and uses a different inner lens, and interprets ways of interacting differently.

An particular experience you had in mind?

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1 minute ago, Ollie said:

Uncanny. For me it was a very similar motivation, somewhat less specific: health

Since it was due to health that I chose to change my way of eating and got into nutrition... my motivation was one and the same as yours!

2 minutes ago, Ollie said:

I don't think you can expect people to get it, not immediately anyway, depends how close you are.

 I agree. It's only with those that have known me a long time that I can freely express more aspects of myself as have them understand me for what I truly mean. With things people might not get, I say them in a semi-serious tone so as to check their reactions. That way if their perspective is very different I can smooth it over as idiosyncratic humour.

7 minutes ago, Ollie said:

Criticism can be kind of a illness in some people because they feel threatened by things better than what they have been able to create.

Maybe the key to knowing when to utilise criticism is to check whether it's one's ego/unresolved insecurities and if one is in a state of Fear - or- whether one is trying to expand understanding about the subject at hand (one is in a state of curiosity and consistency-recognition). 

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Just now, Atom said:

Thank you. I used to be an INTJ before my personality changed.

Really?! I think mine will change quite a bit going forward but MBTI is supposed to be pretty fixed. INTJ to INFP sound like a pretty big change. What did you do?

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Just now, Ollie said:

Really?! I think mine will change quite a bit going forward but MBTI is supposed to be pretty fixed. INTJ to INFP sound like a pretty big change. What did you do?

Learning to follow my intuition and combining it with logic and emotions is what did the change.

2 minutes ago, Andrea Barrett said:

Our differences in personality type might have been why we had a misunderstanding on the forums a while back (on the intent charged water)...

I see.

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